Finally — a way to get your exercise without actually exercising.

Instead of lacing up the Skechers and carving out an hour or two for a run or strenuous walk, or heading off to the gym for a time-consuming and expensive workout, soon you may be able to just sit back and let a machine do all the hard lifting.

Just as it should be in the 21st century.

A new study in the journal Endocrinology touts the benefits of something called whole-body vibration, or WBV. With this method, you can stretch out and relax on a vibrating platform. The process transmits energy to the body and causes the muscles to contract and relax multiple times each second, according to researchers at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.

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Anyway, it worked in mice and hopefully it will work in people, too.

“It’s nice to know that there are potentially other options out there, like whole body vibration, that could have some of the same beneficial effects as exercise and yet be less strenuous or something that could accommodate different schedules or levels of physical activity,” said Meghan McGee-Lawrence, lead author of the study.

In a news release, researchers noted that you can already buy a whole body vibrating device for under $100, although some deluxe models are sold for $2,500. But you can get a vibrating belt for under $20.

Researchers studied two groups of male mice, one of normal weight and one programmed to be obese. They then further divided them up into sedentary, WBV or treadmill groups.

The treadmill group exercised for 45 minutes and had to miss some of their favorite shows like The Price Is Right (wow — Drew Carey has really lost a lot of weight, hey?) and Wheel of Fortune. The WBV group chilled while being vibrated and the third group did no exercising at all.

Obese/ diabetic mice showed similar metabolic benefits from both the WBV and the treadmill. They gained muscle mass and insulin sensitivity.

“These results are encouraging,” McGee-Lawrence said. “However, because our study was conducted in mice, this idea needs to be rigorously tested in humans to see if the results would be applicable to people.”

The idea of vibrating your way to good health is not entirely new. Exercising belts were used as a method of fat reduction back in the 1950s and 1960s, and the concept goes back even further than that.

Here’s a nice collection of some of the old “fat melting” machines.

 
Image credit: A mouse gets a workout in a laboratory tunnel. Via Wikimedia Commons

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