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Higher premiums for younger, healthier people helped fuel opposition to the Affordable Care Act early on. (Credit: Repeal ObamaCare/ Wikimedia Commons)

Democrats are howling about the health care bill passed by the House of Representatives, but it’s likely to resonate with the GOP’s core supporters.

The Affordable Care Act changed the structure of health insurance, mandating that insurers couldn’t charge more for pre-existing conditions, and only three times more for older patients compared to younger ones. That artificially increased premiums for young, healthy people, including those who supported Donald Trump’s candidacy.

You might think, in order to create a better society, that people would be willing to pay for services even though they themselves don’t use them. Childless couples, for example, pay for public education. But somehow, the discussion on health care has become ask not what you can do for your country but ask what you can for me.

Men are complaining about having to purchase policies that include maternity care.

In December, the Kaiser Foundation conducted focus groups among Trump voters to find out what kind of health care plan they wanted. Members of the groups were “unmoved by the principle of risk sharing,” the New York Times reported on Jan. 5.

Although support for the ACA has edged up since the election, a sizeable minority continues to oppose it — a Real Clear Politics polling average puts opposition to the ACA at more than 42 percent, about the same level as President Trump’s approval ratings.

If the new American Health Care Act brings down premiums for younger and healthier Americans, don’t expect a great rush to oust Republicans who voted for it in 2018. They’re just giving their constituents what they want.

In the Kaiser focus groups, participants said they liked the pre-ACA days because they could purchase low-cost plans, “even if it meant that less healthy people had to pay more.”

This is exactly what the new Republican health care system may be about to deliver.

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TRUTH ABOUT DEDUCTIBLES: We keep hearing about how, with deductibles over $5,000 per person under the ACA, the health care plans are expensive and virtually useless. It’s seldom if ever mentioned that benefits kick in well before deductibles are met.

For one thing, plans include a wellness visit, so at least you can get a checkup to find out where you stand.

But let’s say your doctor decides that something needs to be checked out further, and orders an MRI. If you are uninsured, you will pay the full cash rate for that service — which could be up to $3,000. But if you are covered under a policy, even though you are paying for the procedure out-of-pocket, you’re paying much-reduced network negotiated rate.

Instead of the $3,000, you might owe $800. True, you haven’t satisfied your deductible, but you’ve saved $2,200.

The idea that a family of three has to pay a hefty premium of $1,000 a month — and gets no benefit until they fork out $15,000 out-of-pocket — is just dead-wrong.

But hey, if it fits into the anti-ACA argument, let’s keep using it!

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WATER WOES: There’s a lot of talk about how “poor lifestyle choices” contribute to chronic disease.

But there are many environmental risk factors that are clearly beyond our control.

A recent study by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) said contamination of community drinking water is widespread, and provisions of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) of 1974 have not been adequately enforced by the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

“Our research shows that in 2015 alone, nearly 77 million people were served by more than 18,000 community water systems that violated at least one SDWA rule, and there were more than 80,000 violations of SDWA rules that year,” the NRDC said in its May 2 report, Threats on Tap: Widespread Violations Highlight Need for Investment in Water Infrastructure and Protections.

“These violations included exceeding health-based standards, failing to properly test water for contaminants, and failing to report contamination to state authorities or the public.”